Motorcycle Riding as a Group

February 21st, 2012 by Farhan Naqvi in Motorcycle Accidents, Personal Injury

One of the fun things about being a motorcycle owner is going on group rides. That way, you combine the feeling of the open road with the camaraderie of others who share the same interests. But it’s important to know the rules that go along with group riding in order to remain safe and minimize the chances of motorcycle accidents. So here’s a quick little quiz about the finer points of group rides.

Which of the following represents a proper number of motorcyclists participating in “group riding?”

  1. 6 riders
  2. 60 riders
  3. 666 riders
  4. 27 people on one motorcycle

The person responsible for planning the route of a group ride is called the:

  1. road captain
  2. master navigator
  3. man with the plan
  4. Dr. Leonard A. Googlemaps

The motorcycle in front of the group who is responsible for determining speed, turns, and lane changes is called the

  1. lead bike
  2. Leader of the Pack
  3. trailblazer dude
  4. hood ornament

The motorcycle in the back of the group who is in charge of “blocking” traffic for lane merges and turns is called the

  1. drag bike
  2. blockhead boy
  3. UNLV left tackle
  4. person with the crappiest bike

To communicate during a group ride, riders must use:

  1. hand signals
  2. middle-finger signals
  3. contorted facial expressions
  4. flag semaphore (ask your grandparents)

What’s a good rule-of-thumb distance to keep between each bike during a group ride?

  1. two bike lengths
  2. 273 bike lengths
  3. spitting distance
  4. close enough to smell a rider’s body odor cologne

Who should motorcyclists be considerate of during a group ride?

  1. other motorcyclists in the group and other vehicles on the road
  2. other motorcyclists, but not those bastards in cars
  3. cops who you can’t outrun
  4. hot chicks (or dudes)

The correct answers are… well, if you don’t know, you probably aren’t smart enough to operate a motorcycle anyway. So just wave to group riders as they pass you by.

 


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