Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Do I really need to hire a personal injury lawyer?

A:
This question can be answered by giving us a call and telling us what happened. Some cases may not need the services of a personal injury lawyer; however, it is in your best interest to give us a call for a free consultation so we can figure out if you have a case. If it is determined you have a legitimate injury claim, hiring a lawyer makes sense and could yield a larger settlement or verdict as opposed to handling the case yourself.

 

Q: How long does the whole injury litigation process take?

A:
There is no single answer to this question. It really depends on your injury and how complicated the case is. Some lawsuits take a few weeks to resolve, while others can take longer; however, I can assure you I will leave no stone unturned to get the compensation you need and deserve.

 

Q: I have very little money and am worried I can’t afford to hire an injury lawyer. What can I do?

A:
Have no worries. You do not have to pay anything up front. My firm handles cases on a *“contingency fee basis”. This means we only get paid when you get paid.

 

Q:I was hurt in a car crash. What is my personal injury claim worth?

A:
This depends on the severity of your injury. Are you permanently disabled or unable to return to your job because of the injury? Did you lose a loved one in the car wreck? Every case is different, so every settlement/verdict is different. The best way to determine the value of your potential case is to give me a call.

 

Q:What is the difference between a settlement and a verdict?

A:
A settlement is a voluntary agreement between the injured plaintiff (i.e. you) and, usually, the insurance company for the defendant. The settlement will end the case in return for a lump sum payment of a certain amount of money
A verdict is a decision made by a jury. It is usually either “judgment for the plaintiff in the amount of X dollars” or “judgment for the defendant.”

 

Q:What are punitive and compensatory damages?

A:
Punitive and compensatory damages are usually combined to be the sum of a judgment.
Punitive damages are a way to punish the defendant for a serious breach of contract or a particular law and deter them from similar action in the future. These damages are sometimes used to set examples for other companies or individuals who could potentially violate a similar law or contract; however, punitive damages are not always awarded and most judgments are made up of only compensatory damages.
Compensatory damages are meant to make-up for the plaintiff’s injuries. The amount can include compensation for medical bills, legal fees, pain and suffering, etc. where the goal is to properly compensate the plaintiff for the different aspects of their accident and injury.

 

Q:Do you charge by the hour?

A:
No. I am pleased to handle all personal injury cases on a *“contingency fee basis.” What is a *contingency fee? This is where you agree to pay a percentage of the total recovery in the case. The percentage varies depending on the type of injury case. This is a good system for you, the client, since I handle the expenses of initiating the injury litigation process.

 

Q:I didn’t see a doctor until six months after the accident. The insurance company is saying there is a time limit to see a doctor and they won’t pay my expenses. Is there really a time limit to see a doctor?

A:
There is no legal time limit to see a doctor. The insurance company is basically saying that they do not believe your injury was caused by the accident since you waited six months after the accident to see a doctor.

 

Q:Can I sue for something that could have happened?

A:
No. The law provides the pursuit of compensation for an injury that was due to the carelessness of another person, company or entity. There needs to be some type of direct connection between the carelessness and your injury. The fact that something “might” have happened doesn’t count.

 

Q:How much insurance do I need to have on my car?

A:
The state of Nevada requires all vehicles currently registered to maintain liability insurance during the entire registration period, even if you don’t use your car, truck, SUV, or other motor vehicle.

Nevada state law requires the following minimum coverage:

Bodily Injury
$15,000 for the death or injury of any one person, any one accident
$30,000 for all persons in any one accident

Property Damage
$10,000 for any one accident; however, it is recommended you purchase more than the minimum coverage. Why? Because if you’re involved in a major car wreck, you may not be able recover enough to adequately cover medical expenses. For example, if your injury claim is worth $100,000, but you and the at-fault driver only have the $15,000/$30,000 bodily injury minimum, you will only be paid $15,000 by the at-fault driver’s insurance company and $15,000 by your own underinsurance carrier. You should also purchase uninsured motorist/underinsured motorist insurance since roughly 10 to 15 percent of Nevada drivers don’t have adequate car insurance. If you purchase this coverage, you can file a claim against your own insurance to help recover for your injury expenses

 

Q:Is it okay for me to participate in additional rehab that my doctor hasn’t recommended, but I think may help in the healing process?

A:
I strongly recommend avoiding this and all physical rehabilitative activities that are not directly recommended by your doctor. Why? Because insurance defense lawyers will try to use this against you during a deposition and could then use that deposition in court. They could try and argue that you’re capable of performing activity XYZ and this is inconsistent with someone suffering from your particular injury. The best advice to follow is that of your doctor.

Speak with Farhan Naqvi NOW